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mirrorwinonakirk:

Pamela Isley screaming “DO IT FOR THE VINES!” before she sends a wave of strangling foliage in Batman’s direction.

#YES

formerly-comealongpixie:

"steph isn’t a part of the batfam cause bruce never adopted her" well he never adopted babs either it’s called the bat family not the wayne family sit the fuck down



barnesbartonbanner:

Friendly reminder!!! DC making Batgirl more accessible to young girls and Marvel giving the title of Thor to a woman and making the title character of the Captain America Comics a black man are both important and necessary movements in the comic book industry away from canned storylines and casual sexism, racism and elitism!!!!!!!!!!! These decisions do not negate or outdo each other, they are just important steps in the right direction!!!!


dynamic-duo-deposit:

agentturner:

Bruce Wayne has made a lot of stupid decisions in his life, but adopting and training Dick Grayson isn’t one of them

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  • me everytime I read a batfamily fic: ok but where's Cass?

The Myth of Credibility

nicksmedulla:

I’ve never had my geek cred questioned. No one asks me if I “actually read this stuff” as I work behind the counter of my LCS. When I say how much I enjoy a book like Ms. Marvel or Wonder Woman, people take me on my word. When I check out a store in another town, I’m asked what series I collect, not what I’m doing there. If only these people knew I wasn’t “one of them”.

I was 19 the first time I ever set foot in a comic book store. I wasn’t even there to buy a “real comic”, instead leaving with the first two volumes of Scott Pilgrim. It took two years for me to actually set up my first subscription, for the then newly announced Adventure Time. I was late to the party on Saga, Hawkeye, Captain Marvel, Ultimate Spider-Man - books that are now some of my favorites - and I’d never read an issue of Batman until I was working in a comic shop. If I were held to the same standard half the comic reading population is, I’d be branded as a fake.

Instead, I’m seen as an expert by the customers of my store, in equal parts it seems because of my position and gender. When someone brings up a series I am unfamiliar with I can deflect with a simple “let me check if we have that in” and no one questions if I know what I’m doing. People want and take my suggestions of what to read, even though I was the one receiving those same recommendations just a year or two ago. While my job has afforded me the opportunity to catch up on many of the “classics”, I’ve still not gotten through much of the Marvel and DC catalog. Instead I sometimes have to rely on what I know from Wikipedia pages and secondhand accounts. There’s a part of me that is always concerned I’ll be called out as a fake, but in reality, it’s unlikely to ever happen. I get to be a part of the club because I look the part.

I’ll be going to my very first convention in March with a friend who has read comics her entire life. She actually understands exactly what happened in the New 52 continuity shift and can tell you how the plot of the Avengers movie mirrors the original Stan Lee and Jack Kirby issues. If she were a guy, she’d be considered a true fan by any standard. But when she goes to a store, she gets one of two reactions. Either she’ll just be ignored, which at this point she prefers, or she’ll be subjected to a series of increasingly difficult trivia questions, trying to prove her assumed ignorance. A Batman backpack and Wonder Woman key-chain she carries with her every day aren’t enough to convince someone she’s a fan. No one asks here about her opinions on DC’s handling of Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown. Instead she’s asked if she’s there to get something for a boyfriend. At every turn her credibility is questioned.

This entire idea of “credibility”, however, is the real problem. The biggest lie at the center of the “fake geek girl” phenomena is that there are legitimate and illegitimate ways to enjoy comics. Regardless of gender, someone who has only seen the Marvel movies and someone who has all 700 issues of Amazing Spider-Man are both justified in calling themselves comic fans. There shouldn’t be rankings; there shouldn’t be tiers. If you prefer Tomine or Liefeld or Staples;
big two or independents; collecting variants or buying during Comixology sales - none of that should matter. The diversity of this amazing medium is reflected in the unique way each person approaches it and chooses to enjoy it. I’m not suggesting that some people aren’t more passionate about comics than others, but passion = interest + time. By excluding people as they’re just starting out, we’re not giving them a chance to let their passion for comics develop.

We need to work to dismantle this idea of credibility whenever we get the chance and catch ourselves when we’re buying into it. If you’ve ever felt superior to someone else because you knew more about comics, I want you to really think about what you gained from it. Instead of bragging about what you know, share something new with someone who doesn’t. Be the person you wish you’d met when you read your first comic. Remember we all start somewhere and invite someone new to our club.


it’s 1am and what i really want right now is a tim drake + leo fitz friendship i’m not ashamed to admit it


encompassment:

age 7: I want to be a teen titan

age 18: I want to be a teen titan


gothambeat:

quarterclever:

quarterclever:

gaelicwords:

I really just wanted to put this here to say this was why I love Stephanie.
You don’t have to like her, I understand the arguments for not. But when I look at her, I see someone who’s doing her best to be the best she can. She represents Hope, a pretty big concept to me for personal reasons. 
Just thought I’d share. Tis the season. 
 

Stephanie Brown: One of the reasons I finished my undergraduate thesis.

You know, I feel like this is something those of us in academia need to remember more often.

It’s funny because she helped me finish school too

gothambeat:

quarterclever:

quarterclever:

gaelicwords:

I really just wanted to put this here to say this was why I love Stephanie.

You don’t have to like her, I understand the arguments for not. But when I look at her, I see someone who’s doing her best to be the best she can. She represents Hope, a pretty big concept to me for personal reasons. 

Just thought I’d share. Tis the season. 

 

Stephanie Brown: One of the reasons I finished my undergraduate thesis.

You know, I feel like this is something those of us in academia need to remember more often.

It’s funny because she helped me finish school too



do you think sometimes when bruce gets really mad jason’s just like

oh my god bruce go pet a dog or something and then come back


rubixburd asked: "Helena Wayne being all "You just gotta let me be my own man pops" "Selena control your child PlEasE""

"selena help me this is too much for one man talk to her

"bruce you’re such a baby oh my god go punch a bad guy and then come back"


deanwinchestire:

I found an unopened pack of Batman silly bands so I opened them and I caN’T STOP LAUGHING BECAUSE IT LOOKS LIKE HE’S DANCING

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slide to the right

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slide to the left

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take it back now y’all

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CHA CHA REAL SMOOTH